Health & Hygiene 1st

….. over 80% of total LIFETIME medical expenses are paid-out during the last few weeks & months of your life to gain a little extra time……..

….it has been said that it is more prudent for earlier investment in prevention protection, especially in your younger family’s health……

……from 21st Century knowledge & wisdom, it is an imperative that for those that can afford it, sanitary hot & cold water and sanitary air in the home & workplace cannot be neglected;

…….influenza & respiratory diseases are the largest cause of shortened life worldwide; with persons <5years and >50years most severely affected by LD;

…..the bacteria originally present in all water, particularly LD & Pseudomonas should never be inhaled during shower time or bathing derived from water at 20-45 deg.Celcius that is not certified sanitary compliant;

 

Dubai Hotel Faces $16.7million LD Lawsuit

Travel Daily News reports that the suit claims that Thomas Boyle, from Britain, and Elodie Nogues, from France, contracted LD after staying at the Dubai Westin Mina Seyahi in January and February of 2009. The health of the pair deteriorated rapidly and resulted in hospital stays. A third guest, BBC radio commentator Bill Frindall, 69, passed away as a result of contracting the disease.

 

The Long-Term Complications of LD 

The long-term complications of LD (legionellosis) can be serious– even fatal. Although victims of the disease may initially survive infection, sometimes they never fully recover the use of their mental and / or physical faculties. The aftermath of LD  often involves lingering posttraumatic stress disorder, neurologic symptoms (headache, memory loss, concentration problems), and neuromuscular issues (muscle weakness, joint pain, tingling in the extremities). Respiratory issues frequently continue for over 2 years following initial diagnosis and treatment.

According to a report of a recent lawsuit, the complications a man suffered from LD included paralysis of the left side of his body, sight loss, the ability to speak and to read, and permanent brain damage. As a result, he was unable to work and lost the business he had owned for 30 years. Since the death rate of a single outbreak of the disease can be between 20 and 40 percent, and a single source of exposure can infect dozens, or even hundreds of people, the potential exposure of a liable party can be substantial. Reported settlements and jury awards have ranged from $225,000 to $5.2 million. These large awards are meant to compensate survivors of deceased victims, as well as reimburse sufferers of the disease for their pain and suffering. LD lawsuit settlements also include amounts for medical expenses, lost wages, disability and any other lawful damages. The awarding of punitive damages due to gross negligence may also add to the exposure of liable parties.

LD Symptoms: ( flu-like )

  • Mild headache & muscle pains;
  • Fever @ 38C or above;
  • Chills/tiredness;
  • Progressing to persistent dry cough/shortness of breath.

LD Causes: (2-10 days incubation) inhaled/aspirated fine water droplets such as from shower head droplets from plumbing installations that include:

  • Warm water stored at 20-45C (68-113F);
  • Water impurities; rust, lime-scale algae;
  • Inadequate sanitary plumbing skills of water flow;
  • Unskilled water tank storage.

Persons  at LD risk:

  • >50 years of age + or under 5 years age
  • Past or present smoker (incl. Cannabis)
  • Strong alcohol drinkers;
  • Existing diabetes, kidney disease or other infection;
  • Weakened immune system.
  • N.B. Without early correct diagnosis and antibiotic treatment 15-30% Death rate from infection; the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention records over 10,000 deaths/year from LD bacteria.

How common is LD in any given community? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 8,000 to 18,000 people in the U.S. are hospitalized with LD each year. Those most at risk of infection are men and women over age 50, smokers, people with chronic lung disease and those with weak immune systems, according to the NIH. The New York Times reports that cases of LD in the city increased to 225 in 2014 compared to 73 cases reported in 2004.

Can LD be treated? Most people recover with antibiotics, but the disease can be severe, and in some cases, fatal. The fatality rate for the disease can be as high as 30% depending on the outbreak, according to the CDC.

Too Many LD Cases Go Undiagnosed

Some cases of LD go undiagnosed because every case of severe pneumonia is not tested.  We would like to see a stronger recommendation from the CDC that all cases of pneumonia from an unknown source be tested for detection of legionellosis. In addition, both a urinary antigen test AND a culture of respiratory secretion should be done.

Recent LD Deaths 

Sydney, Australia • March 2016 Investigators are still searching for the Legionella source responsible for nine cases of LD identified near the city center of Sydney this month. Some of the cases were hospitalized and one has died.

New England • February 2016 Person-to-person transmission of LD was reported for the first time in February 2016. Researchers concluded that a 48-year-old man was exposed to LD when working around cooling towers in 2014 and then transmitted LD via coughing to his mother while she was caring for him. The mother died on December 1, 2014 and her son about a month later, on January 7th. The LD strain found in both the mother and son matched the strain found in the son’s workplace. The New England Journal of Medicine article is available at  http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc1505356.


Spain • January 2016
More than 230 cases of LD were reported in December and early January near the Spanish town of Manzanares. Several people were hospitalized, three of whom died. Health officials did not confirm a source but suspected an ornamental fountain based on initial test results.


United Kingdom • January 2016
In January, a hotel operator in the UK was fined 54,000 British Pounds for inadequate maintenance of a whirlpool spa implicated in 18 confirmed cases of Pontiac fever in 2011.


Flint, Michigan • November 2015
Michigan health officials said 10 fatal cases of LD, among 88 cases total, occurred in the Flint area between June 2014 and November 2015


France • September 2015
Between mid-August and early September, 8 cases of LD were reported among persons who had been in the city center of Montpellier. As of September 10th, 1 patient had died, 2 were still hospitalized.


NYC Morris Park, Bronx • September 2015
13 cases of LD and 1 death were reported in September among people in the Morris Park neighborhood in the Bronx. . Morris Park is about 6 miles (10 km) northeast of the South Bronx neighborhood where an unrelated LD outbreak involving 120 cases and 12 deaths occurred in July.


Quebec, Canada • August 2015
LD was confirmed in 18 individuals in late August, 2 of whom have died. San Quentin Veterans nursing home in Quincy, IL • August 2015 54 cases of LD and 12 deaths have been reported among residents of a veterans long-term care facility in Quincy, IL since August.


New York City • July 2015
More than 120 people in the South Bronx contracted LD between early July and early August, 12 of whom died